Upcoming Institute Events

Date and TimeTitle and Description
October 30, 2014
7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Hector Carrillo, Associate Professor, Sociology, The Evanston Northwestern Humanities Lecture Series

Members of the Northwestern faculty share and discuss cutting-edge research with the public at the Evanston Public Library. This year, ENHLS will honor the Latino American experience, as part of the "Hecho in the U.S.A" program, which explores various aspects of Latino/Latina culture. Professor Héctor Carrillo is Associate Professor of Sociology and Gender & Sexuality Studies. Carrillo is the author of The Night Is Young: Sexuality in Mexico in the Time of AIDS (University of Chicago Press, 2002), which received the Ruth Benedict Prize from the Society of Lesbian and Gay Anthropologists of the American Anthropological Association. Carrillo currently studies the intersections of sexuality, migration, and heath, especially in relation to the incorporation of migrant populations into U.S. life and society.

November 4, 2014
4:30 PM - 6:30 PM

Dialogue Series: "The Humanities in the Age of Ecological Catastrophe”

with Deborah Coen and Tim Morton. The Dialogue Series bring together nationally prominent scholars to offer different perspectives on a topic. This event is free and open to the public. Reception to follow. Made possible in part by the Harris Lecture Fund. Deborah Coen, Associate Professor and Acting Director of the Center of International History at Barnard College, joined the Barnard faculty in 2006. In addition to teaching for the Department of History, Professor Coen is affiliated with Barnard's Women's Studies Program. Prior to coming to Barnard, Professor Coen was a Junior Fellow of the Harvard Society of Fellows. Professor Coen's research centers on the history of the physical and earth sciences and the cultural history of central Europe. Her current projects include The Earthquake Observers: Disaster Science, 1755-1935, and a history of imperial Austria as a laboratory for studies of the relationship between nature and culture. Timothy Morton is the Rita Shea Guffey Chair in English at Rice University. He is the author ofNothing: Three Inquiries in Buddhism and Critical Theory (Chicago, forthcoming),Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology after the End of the World (Minnesota, 2013), Realist Magic: Objects, Ontology, Causality (Open Humanities, 2013), The Ecological Thought (Harvard UP, 2010), Ecology without Nature (Harvard, 2007), seven other books and one hundred essays on philosophy, ecology, literature, food and music. He blogs regularly athttp://www.ecologywithoutnature.blogspot.com.    

November 20, 2014
7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Nick Davis and Miriam Petty, The Evanston Northwestern Humanities Lecture Series

Members of the Northwestern faculty share and discuss cutting-edge research with the public at the Evanston Public Library. This year, ENHLS will honor the Latino American experience, as part of the "Hecho in the U.S.A" program, which explores various aspects of Latino/Latina culture. Nick Davis, Associate Professor, Department of English Nick Davis (Ph.D. Cornell University) teaches and writes in the areas of film, queer theory, feminist and gender studies, and American literature. His book The Desiring-Image: Gilles Deleuze and Contemporary Queer Cinema (Oxford University Press, 2013) theorizes a new model of contemporary queer cinema based on formal principles rather than identity politics, drawing heavily on Deleuzian philosophies of film, sexuality, and collectivity. Miriam Petty, Assistant Professor, Department of Radio, TV, and Film Miriam Petty has taught and lectured widely on film, African American literature, and Black popular culture. A 2006-2009 fellow of Princeton University’s Society of Fellows, her recent projects include" Race.Place.Space.," a documentary film festival in Trenton, New Jersey, that she curated on behalf of Princeton’s Center for African American Studies. Her book Stealing the Show: African American Performers and Audiences in 1930s Hollywood (University of California Press), explores the complex relationships between black audiences and black performers in the classical Hollywood era.

January 20, 2015
4:30 PM - 6:30 PM

Dialogue Series: "Borderlands”

with Ramón Saldívar and Keller Easterling on Tuesday, January 20th at 4:30 PM.  This event is free and open to the public, and made possible in part by the Harris Lecture Funds.  Reception to follow. Keller Easterling is an architect, writer and professor at Yale University. Her most recent book, Extrastatecraft: The Power of Infrastructure Space (Verso, 2014), examines global infrastructure networks as a medium of polity. Another recent book, Subtraction (Sternberg Press, 2014), considers building removal or how to put the development machine into reverse. An ebook essay, The Action is the Form (Strelka Press, 2012) previews some of the arguments in Extrastatecraft.Other books include: Enduring Innocence: Global Architecture and its Political Masquerades (MIT, 2005) which researched familiar spatial products in difficult or hyperbolic political situations around the world and Organization Space: Landscapes, Highways and Houses in America (MIT, 1999) which applied network theory to a discussion of American infrastructure. Easterling is also the co-author (with Richard Prelinger) of Call it Home: The House that Private Enterprise Built, a laserdisc/DVD history of US suburbia from 1934-1960. She has published web installations including: Extrastatecraft, Wildcards: a Game of Orgman and Highline: Plotting NYC. Easterling’s research and writing was included in the 2014 Venice Biennale, and she has been exhibited at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, the Rotterdam Biennale, and the Architectural League in New York. Easterling has lectured and published widely in the United States and abroad. Ramón Saldívar's teaching and research areas at Stanford have concentrated on the areas of cultural studies, literary theory, modernism, Chicano narrative, and Post-colonial literature. He is also interested in the history of the novel and nineteenth- and early twentieth-century British and American comparative studies. With a degree in Comparative Literature, his publications reflect the variety of his interests. His first book, Figural Language in the Novel: The Flowers of Speech from Cervantes to Joyce (1984), was a study of the authority of meaning in selected canonical European and American novels. His second book, Chicano Narrative: The Dialectics of Difference (1990), is a history of the development of Chicano narrative forms. His most recent book, titled The Borderlands of Culture: Américo Paredes and the Transnational Imaginary (2006), is a study of the modern American borderlands, transnationalism and globalism and their role in creating and delimiting agents of history.

April 23, 2015
7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

John Alba Cutler, The Evanston Northwestern Humanities Lecture Series

Members of the Northwestern faculty share and discuss cutting-edge research with the public at the Evanston Public Library. This year, ENHLS will honor the Latino American experience, as part of the "Hecho in the U.S.A" program, which explores various aspects of Latino/Latina culture. John Alba Cutler John Alba Cutler (Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 2008) specializes in US Latino literatures, multiethnic American poetry, contemporary American literature, and print culture studies. His book Ends of Assimilation: The Formation of Chicano Literature, forthcoming from Oxford University Press, examines how Chicano/a (Mexican American) literary works represent processes of assimilation, and what those representations can teach us about race, gender, and the nature of literary discourse.

 

June 4, 2014