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Kaplan Scholars Instructors

Learn more about the Kaplan Humanities Scholars Program.

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Ana Arjona

Ana Arjona

Kaplan Scholars Instructor; Department of Political Science

Ana Arjona is Associate Professor of Political Science. Her academic interests include violence and conflict, the foundations of political order, state building, local governance, drug trafficking, and drug policy. Her current research projects investigate the causes and consequences of institutional change and individual agency in contexts of violence. She has conducted extensive fieldwork in Colombia and has also carried out field research in Kosovo. At Northwestern she teaches on civil war, research design, and the relation between illegal drugs and politics.
Adia Benton

Adia Benton

Kaplan Scholars Instructor; Department of Anthropology

Adia Benton is Assistant Professor of Anthropology and author of the prize-winning HIV Exceptionalism:  Development Through Disease in Sierra (University of Minnesota, 2015). She is a cultural anthropologist with interests in global health, biomedicine, development and humanitarianism, professional sports, and sub-Saharan Africa.
Lina Britto

Lina Britto

Kaplan Scholars Instructor; Department of History

Lina Britto is a historian of modern Latin America and the Caribbean. Her work situates the emergence and consolidation of illegal drug smuggling networks in the Caribbean and Andean regions of Colombia in the context of a growing articulation between the South American country and the United States during the Cold War. She has published in Revista Contemporánea (Uruguay), the Hispanic American Historical ReviewNorth American Congress on Latin America-NACLA, and El Espectador (Colombia). Her book on Colombia’s marijuana boom in the 1970s will be published by the University of California Press (2020).
Mark Hauser

Mark Hauser

Kaplan Scholars Instructor; Department of Anthropology

Mark Hauser is an historical archaeologist who specializes in materiality, slavery and inequality. These key themes intersect in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries Atlantic and Indian Oceans and form a foundation on his research on the African Diaspora and Colonial Contexts. As an archaeologist who studies how people adapt to landscapes of inequality and contribute to those landscapes in material ways, he employs ethnohistorical, archaeological, and archaeometric approaches. His current fieldwork is based in the Eastern Caribbean and has focused on two communities in Dominica- Portsmouth and Soufriere. He also has research interests in 18th century Southern India and 19th century North America.
Daniel Immerwahr

Daniel Immerwahr

Kaplan Scholars Instructor; Department of History

Daniel Immerwahr is Associate Professor of History.  His first book, Thinking Small (Harvard, 2015), offers a critical account of the United States' pursuit of grassroots development at home and abroad in the middle of the twentieth century. His second book, How to Hide an Empire (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2019), is a narrative history of the United States' overseas territory.
Jules Law

Jules Law

Kaplan Scholars Instructor; Department of English

Jules Law is Professor of English literature and a specialist in nineteenth-century British literature. His most recent book is The Social Life of Fluids:  Blood, Milk, and Water in the Victorian Novel (Cornell, 2010).  He is currently working on a book entitled Virtuality in the Victorian Age. He has received numerous teaching and public-service awards, including the Charles Deering McCormick Professorship of Teaching (2007) and the Centro Romero Community Leadership award (2008).
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